Spot Prices of Gold, Silver, Platinum, and Palladium

Gold and Silver Spot Prices

Gold and silver spot prices fluctuate moment to moment. What traders buy "on the spot" via a settled contract when you're trading is the spot price. Spot prices aren't the same as derivatives like futures and options. 

On this page you'll find charts for the spot prices of gold, silver, platinum, and palladium.

Gold Vs Silver, Platinum, Palladium, and the Dow Jones Commodity Index

Spot Price of Gold

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Spot Price of Silver

Spot Price of Platinum

Spot Price of Palladium

What Is Spot Price? 

The spot price - spot contract, or just "spot" - is the cash price you will pay for the immediate delivery of an asset like currencies, stocks, cryptocurrencies, and other securities. Spot prices change constantly and are used by traders and market makers to determine futures prices. 

What are the spot prices of gold and silver?

Using the examples on this page, the spot price of gold and silver, for example, is the price a trader would pay for the immediate exchange of ownership of the precious metal "on the spot. 

The difference between the spot prices and market price of precious metals: 

Market prices refer to any price at any point in the market and are used mostly as reference points. Therefore, the spot price is also a market price, but not necessarily vice versa. Spot price refers to the price of the actual item sold, and is not a future, option, or other derivative. 

Live Precious Metals Spot Prices FAQs

What is the price of gold and silver right now?

The spot price, or live price, of gold and silver and other commodities fluctuates constantly. The below data shows the most current up to date price of gold and silver right now: 

How do I buy gold and silver at spot price?

The truth is it's very difficult for retail traders to buy gold and silver (and other commodities) at spot price, but you can get close. There will almost always be costs involved for most traders. Those costs include: Vendor costs, refinement costs, shipping/handling, etc. The trick is to try and minimize those costs as much as possible to get you closer to true spot prices. For example, the larger your order size, the less premiums you will pay per ounce.

What does the spot price mean when selling?

When selling precious metals your goal is to sell at or as near possible to the spot price. The spot price is the price the buyer agrees to purchase the commodities on the spot. Usually when selling gold and silver and other precious metals bullion dealers will offer around 95% of spot prices. This can vary depending on the dealer, market conditions, etc. 

How much over spot price can you expect to pay on gold and silver?

Typically most retail traders can expect to pay approximately 5% over spot prices on gold and silver. When buying and selling commodities, there are multiple costs, making selling at true spot prices nearly impossible. 

Why are some companies spot prices different for precious metals?

Spot prices fluctuate from company to company and market to market due to a number of factors: market conditions can fluctuate rapidly and there is no single source of truth for spot prices. Companies are all relying on different sources of data to determine spot prices. 

What is the price change in gold and silver today?

Here's the change in gold and silver prices today: 

spot prices of gold and silver

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